Sharing the Holy Land

Les 12 et 13 juin prochains, se tiendra à Londres, au Warburg Institute, un colloque intitulé Sharing the Holy Land : Perceptions of shared sacred space in the Medieval and Early Modern Mediterranean.

Sharing_the_Holy_Land__Poster_

La problématique de ce colloque porte donc essentiellement sur la question des sanctuaires et des lieux de culte “partagés” entre plusieurs religions: judaïsme, christianisme et islam.

Une grande partie des interventions s’appuie sur et analyse les récits de voyages et de pèlerinage en Terre sainte.

Voici la liste des interventions :

– Benjamin Z. Kedar (The Hebrew University of Jerusalem), ‘The Various Meanings of “Shared Sacred Space”’

– Bernard Hamilton (University of Nottingham), ‘The Mount Sinai Monastery: A Successful Example of Shared Holy Space’

– Phil Booth (University of Lancaster), Bathing in the Boundaries of the Holy Land: Latin Perspectives on Christian Devotion at the Jordan, c.1099-1291

– Anthony Bale (Birkbeck College, Univ. of London), Mount Joy: Pilgrimage and Emotional Landscape in Late Medieval Palestine

– Michele Campopiano (University of York), Islam and Muslims in Franciscan Descriptions of the Holy Land: The Role of the Convent of Mount Zion, c. 1330-1530

– Lucy-Anne Hunt (Manchester Metropolitan University), From the Church of the Nativity at Bethlehem to the Church of St Theodore at Behdaidat: Art, Politics and Communities in Sacred spaces in the Levant between the 12th-13th Centuries

– Gil Fishhof (Tel Aviv University), The Western and Byzantine Elements of the Mural Cycle of the Church of the Resurrection at Abu Gosh: A Manifestation of a Shared Sacred Space

– Lisa Mahoney (DePaul University), Understanding Absence: The Church Façades of the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem

– Georg Leube (Marburg University), Permeability and Mutual Congruence as Categories in the Study of Shared Sacred Space: The Case of 12th/13th-Century Jazīra

– Marci Freedman (University of Manchester), Mingling at the Sites: Shared Sacred Space in Benjamin of Tudela’s Book of Travels

– Lucy Donkin (University of Bristol), Worth Their Weight in Gold: The Imprints at the Dome of the Rock between Islam and Christianity

– Camille Rouxpetel (École Française de Rome), Sharing the Holy Places, Unifiying Christianity

– Beatrice Saletti (Università degli Studi di Udine), ”Ululant more luporum”: Frankish Perceptions of Other Christians’ Liturgies in Churches of the Holy Land

– James Hill (University of Leeds), Sharing New Rome: Papal Directives to Pera in Constantinople during the Fourteenth Century

– Yuri Stoyanov (SOAS),  Title TBC

– Osama Hamdan (Al-Quds University, Jerusalem), Preserving the Memory of St. John the Baptist/Prophet Yahia’s Tomb in Sabastiya by Christian and Muslim Communities

– Nickiphoros Tsougarakis (Edge Hill University), Sharing on the Way to the Holy Land: The Shrine of Our Lady of Cassiope on the Island of Corfu

– Anthony Luttrell, Shared Worship at Filerimos on Rhodes: 1306-1420

– Giuseppe Perta (Medalics – Università per Stranieri Dante Alighieri di Reggio Calabria), Illa famosa granaria. The Pyramids in the Eyes of the Western Pilgrims

– Jan Vandeburie (Warburg Institute), Knowledge of the Other and Understanding Shared Sacred Space, c. 1150-1250

– Alexia Lagast (University of Antwerp), Sharing Sacred Space in Late Fifteenth-Century Travel Narratives

– Nicholas Morton (Nottingham Trent University), Did the First Crusade Initiate a “Clash of Civilizations” between Christianity and Islam?

– Alan V. Murray (University of Leeds), The Distribution of Religious Communities in the City of Jerusalem under Frankish Rule, in the Period 1099-1187

– Julian Yolles (Harvard University), Vespasian’s Sword and Crown: Reading Josephus in the Latin East

– Alessandro Tedesco (Catholic University of Milan), The Itinera ad Loca Sancta Collection in the Franciscan Libraries in Jerusalem

– Dionigi Albera (Institut dˈEthnologie Méditerranéenne, Européenne et Comparative, CNRS-Aix-Marseille University), On the “Lieux Saints Partagés” exhibition at the Musée des Civilisations de l’Europe et de la Méditerranée (Marseille)

– Closing remarks : Glenn Bowman (University of Kent), Modern Perspectives on Sharing the Sacred in the Middle Ages

On peut trouver le programme complet ici.


Laisser un commentaire

Votre adresse e-mail ne sera pas publiée.

Ce site utilise Akismet pour réduire les indésirables. En savoir plus sur comment les données de vos commentaires sont utilisées.